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ONLINE CATALOGUE > RECENTLY PUBLISHED > THE NEW AFRICAN: A HISTORY
THE NEW AFRICAN THE NEW AFRICAN
A History of the Radical Review, with Cape Escape 1964, an account of the authors' escape from South Africa
by Randolph Vigne and James Currey

The New African - The Radical Review was first published in Cape Town in 1962. Over the next seven years the magazine brought together white South Africans and influential Black writers: Bessie Head, Lewis Nkosi, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Ndabaningi Sithole, Can Themba, and others. It provided a place for independent radical thinking and creative writing about Africa.

It was 'a magazine aimed at opening up debate and spreading the word about the new Africa. The New African - subtitled 'the radical monthly' - was founded to speak for this new Africa, a newly born concept to analyse, report on and rejoice in. It also looked ahead to the ultimate collapse of white-racial supremacy strategies and the dawn of non-racial democracy in South Africa.

It soon attracted unwanted attention: the issue of 28 March 1964 records 'On 9 March 1964 policemen from the Cape Town security police HQ raided the offices of The New African. …The entire contents…was removed…. from a locked filing cabinet, carried by four (black) constables, to a handful of rubber stamps carried by one (white) constable.' Editors were forced to flee. Printing was now done in London and copies were smuggled back to South Africa.

This book outlines the scope of its publishing and then turns to an account of the escape of Randolph Vigne, clandestine editor of The New African, from Cape Town to Canada, facilitated by James Currey and the latter's own departure from South Africa.

With 8 black & white magazine covers and photos.

ISBN. 978-0-85036-623-5

paperback, 73 pages


Price:8.99


ONLINE CATALOGUE > RECENTLY PUBLISHED > THE NEW AFRICAN: A HISTORY